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Allergy

Effects of maternal dietary egg intake during early lactation on human milk ovalbumin concentration: a randomized controlled trial

Abstract

Background:

There is limited understanding of how maternal diet affects breastmilk food allergen concentrations, and whether exposure to allergens through this route influences the development of infant oral tolerance or sensitization.

Objective:

To investigate how maternal dietary egg ingestion during early lactation influences egg protein (ovalbumin) levels detected in human breastmilk.

Early life innate immune signatures of persistent food allergy

Abstract

Background

Food allergy naturally resolves in a proportion of food allergic children without intervention, however the underlying mechanisms governing the persistence or resolution of food allergy in childhood are not understood.

Objectives

This study aimed to define the innate immune profiles associated with egg allergy at one year of age, determine the phenotypic changes that occur with the development of natural tolerance in childhood and explore the relationship between early life innate immune function and serum vitamin D.

Timing of food introduction and development of food sensitization in a prospective birth cohort

Abstract

Background

The effect of infant feeding practices on the development of food allergy remains controversial. We examined the relationship between timing and patterns of food introduction and sensitization to foods at age 1 year in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) birth cohort study.

Randomized controlled trial of early regular egg intake to prevent egg allergy

Abstract

Background

The ideal age to introduce egg into the infant diet has been debated for the past 2 decades in the context of rising rates of egg allergy.

Objective

We sought to determine whether regular consumption of egg protein from age 4 to 6 months reduces the risk of IgE-mediated egg allergy in infants with hereditary risk, but without eczema.

Two-step egg introduction for prevention of egg allergy in high-risk infants with eczema (PETIT): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Abstract

Background

Evidence is accumulating that early consumption is more beneficial than is delayed introduction as a strategy for primary prevention of food allergy. However, allergic reactions caused by early introduction of such solid foods have been a problematic issue. We investigated whether or not early stepwise introduction of eggs to infants with eczema combined with optimal eczema treatment would prevent egg allergy at 1 year of age.

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