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Nutrient composition

Does dietary protein reduce hip fracture risk in elders? The Framingham osteoporosis study

Summary  
Association between dietary protein and fracture risk is unclear. We examined association between energy-adjusted protein intake and hip fracture risk in elders. The risk of hip fracture was reduced in upper quartiles of protein intake when compared with lowest quartile.

Introduction  
Studies of the association between dietary protein intake and hip fracture risk are conflicting. Therefore, we examined protein intake and hip fracture risk in a population-based group of elderly men and women.

Assessment of the UK iodine status: a National Survey

The UK population may now be iodine-deficient, warranting a full review and evidence-based recommendations to safeguard public health, according to new research.

Iodised salt has helped to reduce iodine deficiency globally, but is not currently used in the UK.

The findings, presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference, provide the only current data on the UK’s iodine status; demonstrating iodine-deficiency in a large sample of the population.

Essential amino acid and carbohydrate supplementation ameliorates muscle protein loss in humans during 28 days bedrest

Abstract

Bed rest studies revealing a “horrifying” loss of muscle mass in older people after just a few days of inactivity should serve as a wake-up call for industry to put tackling sarcopenia higher up the priority list, scientists have argued.

Speaking at the IFT show earlier this month, Dr Douglas Paddon Jones at the University of Texas medical branch, said: “If you put healthy people in their 70s* in bed for 10 days, they can lose 10 percent of their total lean leg mass. That’s a tremendous muscle loss.”

Protein supplementation lowers blood pressure in overweight adults: effect of dietary proteins on blood pressure (PROPRES), a randomized trial

Background:
Dietary protein intake may help to manage blood pressure (BP) and prevent complications associated with elevated BP.

Objective:
The objective of this study was to determine whether 4 wk of increased protein intake (∼25% compared with ∼15% of energy intake that isoenergetically replaces carbohydrate intake) lowers office and daytime BP compared with increased carbohydrate intake.

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