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Egg ingestion in adults with type 2 diabetes: effects on glycemic control, anthropometry, and diet quality—a randomized, controlled, crossover trial

01/12/2016

Abstract

Background

The inclusion of eggs as part of a healthful diet for adults with diabetes is controversial. We examined the effects of including eggs in the diet of adults with type 2 diabetes on cardiometabolic risk factors.

Methods

Randomized, controlled, single-blind, crossover trial of 34 adults (mean age 64.5 years; 14 postmenopausal women, 20 men) with type 2 diabetes assigned to one of two possible sequence permutations of two different 12-week treatments (two eggs/day inclusion or egg exclusion), with 6-week washout periods. For the egg inclusion phase, participants received advice from a dietitian on how to preserve an isocaloric condition relative to the egg exclusion phase. The primary outcome was glycemic control as measured by glycated hemoglobin. Secondary measures included anthropometry, blood pressure, and diet quality.

Results

Compared with the exclusion of eggs in the habitual diet, the inclusion of eggs did not measurably affect glycated hemoglobin (0.01±0.5% vs −0.24±0.7%; p=0.115) and systolic blood pressure (−0.8±13.0 vs −3.0±10.0 mm Hg; p=0.438); and significantly reduced body mass index (0.06±0.8 vs −0.4±0.8 kg/m²; p=0.013) and visceral fat rating (0.2±1.1 vs −0.4±1.0; p=0.016). The inclusion of eggs in the habitual diet of diabetics significantly reduced waist circumference (−0.4±1.2 cm; p=0.004) and percent body fat (−0.7±1.8; p=0.033) from baseline.

Conclusions

Short-term daily inclusion of eggs in the habitual diet of adults with type 2 diabetes does not improve glycemic control but can improve anthropometric measures.

Reference

Njike, V; Ayettey, R; Rajebi, H; et al. Egg ingestion in adults with type 2 diabetes: effects on glycemic control, anthropometry, and diet quality—a randomized, controlled, crossover trial. (2016) http://drc.bmj.com/content/4/1/e000281.full 

 

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